Podcast Episode 105- Bri Castellini

4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode, I chat with Bri Castellini,Community Director for Stareable.com, about how to build a community of collaborators and an audience.

No Rest for the Weekend is hosted by Victoria Oliver and is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Overcast. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

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Podcast Episode 104- James Oxford

4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode I sit down with indie film producer, James Oxford about his career and the importance of making short films.

No Rest for the Weekend is hosted by Victoria Oliver and is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and SoundCloud. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Podcast Episode 103-Adonis Tsilimparis

4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode, I chat with composer, Adonis Tsilimparis about his career, his process, and how to make it as a composer for film and television.

No Rest for the Weekend is hosted by Victoria Oliver and is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and SoundCloud. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Podcast Episode 102-Meredith Edwards

4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

On this episode of the No Rest for the Weekend Podcast, Meredith Edwards visits me in the Rabbit Hole Studio to talk about directing and being a woman in film.

No Rest for the Weekend is hosted by Victoria Oliver and is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and SoundCloud. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Watch This Film- Now On Stareable.com

 

WTF collage

4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

I’m very pleased to announce our series, Watch This Film, is now available on Stareable.com. Stareable is “the largest community of web series creators and fans.” It’s a site that essentially curates web series by genre and features outstanding web shows with their Staff Picks. Their goal is to take the web series form to the next level by shining a light on web shows and the creators behind them. For anyone who is looking to rise above the online noise and escape the endless sea of YouTube, Stareable.com can be a great place to showcase your series.

They’ve also built an extensive community of creators online with the mission of helping them communicate with each other through their Filmmaker Community forum. So far, they’ve managed to connect creators together allowing them to critique each other’s work and even collaborate on new projects. Stareable was created out of CEO Ajay Kishore’s passion for television and web series, and the passion really shows.

If you’re a content creator or a fan of web series, Stareable is a great place to find shows you may otherwise have missed. Curation sites like Stareable are needed more and more these days as the amount of online content grows. Fans and content creators will need a place to watch and showcase their work. We’re very pleased to be a part of the site and hope to add more series projects very soon.

 

BTRP Recommends-Looking for Richard

Image result for looking for richard movie poster

4749584 by Jason Godbey, Creative Director of Behind the Rabbit Productions

How do you make a movie about a 15th Century King of England in 1990s Manhattan? Ask Al Pacino. He made Looking for Richard, a docu-drama adaptation William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Richard III.

Looking for Richard is Al Pacino’s interpretation of Richard III with Pacino directing and starring  in the title role. The film handles the complicated task of interpreting Shakespeare’s play by telling us historical context in which Richard III Gloucester came to power. It covers The War of the Roses, the victory of the Yorks, and the relationships between various royals, and relatives.  The film does this so well that the movie serves as a live-action Cliff Notes.

Pacino travels to England and visits Stratford-upon-Avon where Shakespeare was born, but the much of the movie was filmed in New York City. He made the film on a small budget and couldn’t possibly fly his cast across an ocean, so he filmed of the scenes from the play in rehearsal, the actors reading the script around a table, or sometimes in full costume on a stage.  For a few key scenes, he managed to find a Medieval setting in Manhattan. Imagine that.

This is truly resource filmmaking at its best. Pacino filmed his exteriors at The Cloisters, a museum in Manhattan built to resemble a medieval castle, and his interiors at St. John the Divine, one oldest and largest churches in the US. Combined with period costumes and the acting chops of Alec Baldwin, Kevin Spacey, Winona Ryder, and many others, the movie makes us believe we’re in the world of Shakespeare’s play.

In addition to showing us the inner workings of the play, we also see Pacino’s struggle in making his film which took four years to complete. We see him attempt to conquer the challenge of performing Shakespeare as an American actor, grappling with the language, and the challenge of filming the film’s climax, The Battle of Bosworth Field on a small budget.

This film is an extraordinary achievement considering Pacino essentially made the film in his spare time in between movies. He didn’t have money to buy himself out of trouble, so he employed old fashion movie tricks, creative editing techniques. It’s a lesson to any filmmaker you don’t need a ton of money in order to make an audience understand a 400 year old play about a 500 year old English king.

I highly recommend this movie for anyone who is interested in Shakespeare or for filmmakers interested in making a documentary. It’s one of those movies that can be viewed over and over again. Seeing the Pacino’s process as he and his collaborators battle the play, make mistakes, but ultimately convey his love for Shakespeare and Richard III is both inspiring and entertaining. Much like Shakespeare’s plays, Looking for Richard has withstood the test of time. It was released in 1996, and is still just as enjoyable and relatable today as it was 20 years ago.

Cinesummit Part Five- Ryan Connolly

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4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director of Behind the Rabbit Productions

I learned about Cinesummit through Ryan Connolly’s YouTube channel, Film Riot. Connolly has become a master DIY filmmaker, and over the years, he’s created a successful production company. He’s built a million plus subscriber base on YouTube, and has an impressive body of work.

Film Riot breaks down the techniques used to create the special effects used in Hollywood films. They also show viewers practical hacks on how to get cinematic results with DIY equipment. The content is great for every level of filmmaker from novice to expert. I highly recommend his channel.

 

Cinesummit Part Four-Alex Di Marco

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4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

Alex Di Marco is another filmmaker whose advice I found to be extremely valuable. He talked about how to win a job. How do you get clients? How can you better communicate your vision to a clients and your team? His answer, the treatment.

Di Marco went in depth on how to create a compelling treatment, including the overall tone of the piece, a look-book and color palette and the technical aspects of which equipment and shots he’ll use. All of this is done upfront. He does a lot of thinking and work on spec (for free) before he has the job, and that has made all the difference in his career.

Di Marco also mentioned even with a great treatment, the client may not like it, but they’ll appreciate the effort. On more than one occasion, he’s had a client not go with his first treatment, but he got the job because they appreciated his effort and saw the quality of his work.

Many filmmakers balk at the idea of doing any work for free, but in this competitive market, commercial directors and producers have to go the extra mile. It can be time consuming, but it’s that type of well thought out pitch that wins the job.

 

NAB Show 2017

4749584 by Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

I got a chance to attend this year’s NAB Show which is a big gear show held in New York City.  All the major camera brands were there: Sony, Canon, Panasonic, Black Magic Design, JVC. In addition, there are monitors, camera support rigs, broadcast equipment, audio gear as well as displays from major rental houses around the city.

Going to these shows can be beneficial for filmmakers and content creators who want to see the latest gear. They are also a great place to meet other filmmakers. Many of the sales reps at these shows are freelance camera operators and DPs, so if you’re looking for people to hire for your next project, you may find someone. You may also get a chance to meet people from production companies who may want to collaborate with you.

Special thanks for Fernando Castaldi and the good people of Ikan for helping with the shooting of this video using their one of their gimbals.

Cinesummit Part Three- Blake Farber

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By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

Blake Farber is a director who made his way into the industry by making music videos. He’s traveled all over the world and works with everyone from Korean K-Pop bands to Beyonce. The main take away I got from his talk was that we as filmmakers need to see the whole market place. There is work all over the world, not just in New York, Los Angeles and other major American cities, and if you want to be successful, you have to go where the money is.

Another huge part of his success was networking. Farber started out as a musician and was in a band. He went on tour and made friends with other bands and started shooting music videos for them. He built his reel working with people he knew. Word of his talent spread through the music community, and with a reputation as a highly capable director,  he was referred to more and more clients. It’s a very traditional “go with what you know” approach, but it works.

He also wasn’t afraid to go out and find work. When he wanted to work with K-pop bands in Korea, he made cold calls, found connections, and was able to get bands to work with him out there. It’s a lot of leg work, but he was successful because he made the effort.

Every director needs to be his own agent when starting out. If you want to get something made, you have to have that business sense and ability to sell yourself. Building a reel and marketing yourself is essential. This interview again stressed the importance of networking. If you’re a filmmaker, and you don’t feel confident talking to people at an event or asking your friends to work with you, or selling yourself to a new client, it’s definitely a skill to improve. Blake Farber took himself all over the world and built his career on his talent and his ability to sell himself.

If you’re not networking right now, start looking on social media for filmmaker groups. They’re are quite a few on Facebook. Start checking resources like meetup.com to find events in your area. Those are good places to start.