Remembering Alien

Review by Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

Forty years ago in the summer of ’79, Alien, a revolutionary science-fiction/horror film made its way out into the world, bursting on the scene much like its titular character burst out of the chest of an unsuspecting John Hurt. Memory: The Origins of Alien explores the ideology and influences that gave birth to Alien as well as the film’s production and its meaning. 

Documentaries about the origins of movies are nothing new. In fact, there are documentaries, video essays, reviews, books, etc. about Alien which have existed since its release. One need look no further than the various DVD and Blu Ray releases of Alien to find how it was made. This raises the central question to the making of this documentary: what is left to say about this film that hasn’t already been said? Memory explores the Greco-Roman myths and the Lovecraftian imagery that influenced the creators of Alien. 

Alien is the brainchild of Dan O’Bannon, H.R. Geiger, and Ridley Scott; each one a visionary in his own right. This documentary explores their influences and how they were able to conceive what some consider a perfect horror film in space that spawned a franchise that has lasted until this day. 

Another unique way Memory explores Alien is through its discussion about the themes of the film, themes that were perhaps unconsciously explored by its creators. Themes such as feminism, male rape, male pregnancy, and patriarchal guilt can all be seen in its imagery. It is a testament to the documentary that these themes aren’t usually referenced in other films about the Alien franchise. 

Memory: The Origins of Alien comes from the mind of writer/director Alexandre O. Philippe, who uses stark lighting and dramatic angles to interview his subjects, mimicking the style of the film they’re discussing. It’s easy to see this was a labor of love for Philippe whose filmography is largely comprised of movies about movies including 2017’s 78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene and 2014’s Doc of the Dead.  

If you’re an a sci-fi fan, or a fan of movies in general, you’ll find something to love in Memory. It’s more than just the making of a movie. It’s a love letter to Alien and a gift to cinefiles. 

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“Don’t Be Nice. Be Necessary.”

DON’T BE NICE – Official Trailer from Radio Drama Network on Vimeo.

By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

At the IFC Center in the heart of Greenwich Village, New York City, the new documentary Don’t Be Nice is currently playing in limited release. Don’t Be Nice is an unflinching look inside the Bowery Poetry Slam Team as they prepare for the National Poetry Slam competition. 

The film takes place during the summer of 2016 beginning with a night at the Bowery Poetry Club and ending with the National Poetry Slam in Atlanta, GA. At the heart of this movie are five poets; Ashley August, Timothy DuWhite, Joel Francois, Sean MEGA Desvignes, and Noel Quińońes who are guided by their coaches, Jon Sands and Lauren Whitehead as they write and perform hard-hitting poems that will advance them to the next level of competition and hopefully win them national competition honors which will open opportunities for teaching, tours, and book deals for them.

We witness the poets struggle to improve with each rehearsal and with each revision. Their performances are powerful and moving and somehow unpretentious.  Lauren Whitehead stands out as she continually pushes the young performers to dig deeper and make their poems personal and therefore more compelling. If you’re unfamiliar with slam poetry, Don’t Be Nice will open your mind and may leave you thinking “I didn’t know poetry could do all that.”

Director Max Powers and cinematographer Peter Eliot Buntaine take us inside the world of these artists and take us through their arduous and sometimes painful process. We see their breakdowns and breakthroughs as they experience deeply emotional moments. The poets talk about copeing with the death of loved ones, sexual and physical abuse, and the harsh realities of what it’s like to be a person of color in America today.

The writing sessions in the film can almost seem like therapy sessions which in the wrong hands would seem exploitative or like a cheap reality show, but somehow the filmmakers were able to capture these moments in a way that has us feeling as if we’re on this journey of discovery with the poets. We’re right their in the same room being moved by their stories and their work, not looking down at them or putting them in a box. It’s a fine line the film walks masterfully.

Following the screening there was a Q&A with producer Nikhil Melnechuk and editor David Lieberman. When I asked about the process of creating the film and how they were able to show these moments of emotion without devolving into manipulative exploitation, they explained that they conducted 10 test screenings with different audiences. After each screening, they made changes according to audience feedback. In some cases, this could prove to be a recipe for disaster due to the classic “too many cooks in the kitchen” problem and over-correcting, but it helped the film tremendously. They were able to continually improve cut by cut.

Another stand out moment is a performance of a poem by Ashley August staged in a Manhattan subway. Her poem is a satiric take on her own personal issues an anxieties. Her performance is impactful and at times hilarious. The scene could almost be considered a short film within the film as it illustrates how poetry can prove to be cinematic in the right hands.

Each performer is given a moment to shine as we see their work develop from the writers’ room to the stage. We see their courage, their audacity, and the love of their craft. This is a movie about making art for its own sake and the hope that art can make the world a better place. It’s a fantastic film and a must-see. Its title comes from the saying , “Don’t be nice. Be necessary,” and it is just that… necessary.

After a year on the festival circuit, Don’t Be Nice is now in limited release in New York City at the IFC Center until September 26th and opens in Los Angeles on September 27th. It will make its television premiere on October 11th 2019 on Fuse TV. 

The Infamous Future’s John Campbell

Host Jason Godbey interviews John Campbell at the opening night party of The Bowery Film Festival

On a previous episode of No Rest for the Weekend: Indie Film News, Chris Gillard and I talked about The Infamous Future, a documentary about Eagle Academy. Last week, I caught up with John Campbell who was supporting his fellow filmmakers at the opening night party The Bowery Film Festival. Look for an in-depth interview with Campbell on a future episode of No Rest for the Weekend.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Spotify, and Google Play. Please remember to like, rate, subscribe, and share. You can also send us your questions, and suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Episode 418: Jose Rodriguez/Tribeca Film Institute

Hosted By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

On this episode Jose Rodriguez, Director of the Documentary Film Program at the Tribeca Film Institute talks about TFI and how they help filmmakers realize their vision.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Spotify, and Google Play. Please remember to like, rate, subscribe, and share. You can also send us your questions, and suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show

Episode 416: Melinda Hall

Hosted By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

On this episode we continue to celebrate Women’s History Month with Melinda Hall as she talks about producing her documentary series How Shakespeare Changed My Life and gives her advice for aspiring creators.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Spotify, and Google Play. Please remember to like, rate, subscribe, and share. You can also send us your questions, and suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Episode 405: Matthew Taylor

Hosted by Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

This is the most dangerous episode of No Rest for the Weekend yet. Director Matthew Taylor talks about his film The Creepy Line. If you’re a documentary filmmaker, this episode is a must-see.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on  YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Spotify, and Google Play. Please remember to like, rate, subscribe, and share. You can also send us your questions, and suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Episode 307: Jordan Elizabeth Gelber

Hosted by Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode, Jordan Elizabeth Gelber talks about her production company, Starbaby Enterprises and gives advice on how to just get started making films and content.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Google Play. Please remember to like, rate, subscribe, and share. You can also send us your questions, and suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Episode 303: Darren E. Johnson

Hosted by Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode, producer Darren E. Johnson (I Am Legend, Hitch) talks about being an independent vs a corporate filmmaker and defines the various producer roles on a film.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Google Play. Please remember to like, rate, subscribe, and share. You can also send us your questions, and suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Episode 301: Jon Alpert

Hosted by Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode, Emmy Nominated documentary director/producer Jon Alpert (Baghdad ER, Rock and a Hard Place) talks about his career and what it takes to be a documentary filmmaker. This is a must-see for anyone looking to make documentary films.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Google Play. Please remember to like, rate, subscribe, and share. You can also send us your questions, and suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

BTRP Recommends-Looking for Richard

Image result for looking for richard movie poster

4749584 by Jason Godbey, Creative Director of Behind the Rabbit Productions

How do you make a movie about a 15th Century King of England in 1990s Manhattan? Ask Al Pacino. He made Looking for Richard, a docu-drama adaptation William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Richard III.

Looking for Richard is Al Pacino’s interpretation of Richard III with Pacino directing and starring  in the title role. The film handles the complicated task of interpreting Shakespeare’s play by telling us historical context in which Richard III Gloucester came to power. It covers The War of the Roses, the victory of the Yorks, and the relationships between various royals, and relatives.  The film does this so well that the movie serves as a live-action Cliff Notes.

Pacino travels to England and visits Stratford-upon-Avon where Shakespeare was born, but the much of the movie was filmed in New York City. He made the film on a small budget and couldn’t possibly fly his cast across an ocean, so he filmed of the scenes from the play in rehearsal, the actors reading the script around a table, or sometimes in full costume on a stage.  For a few key scenes, he managed to find a Medieval setting in Manhattan. Imagine that.

This is truly resource filmmaking at its best. Pacino filmed his exteriors at The Cloisters, a museum in Manhattan built to resemble a medieval castle, and his interiors at St. John the Divine, one oldest and largest churches in the US. Combined with period costumes and the acting chops of Alec Baldwin, Kevin Spacey, Winona Ryder, and many others, the movie makes us believe we’re in the world of Shakespeare’s play.

In addition to showing us the inner workings of the play, we also see Pacino’s struggle in making his film which took four years to complete. We see him attempt to conquer the challenge of performing Shakespeare as an American actor, grappling with the language, and the challenge of filming the film’s climax, The Battle of Bosworth Field on a small budget.

This film is an extraordinary achievement considering Pacino essentially made the film in his spare time in between movies. He didn’t have money to buy himself out of trouble, so he employed old fashion movie tricks, creative editing techniques. It’s a lesson to any filmmaker you don’t need a ton of money in order to make an audience understand a 400 year old play about a 500 year old English king.

I highly recommend this movie for anyone who is interested in Shakespeare or for filmmakers interested in making a documentary. It’s one of those movies that can be viewed over and over again. Seeing the Pacino’s process as he and his collaborators battle the play, make mistakes, but ultimately convey his love for Shakespeare and Richard III is both inspiring and entertaining. Much like Shakespeare’s plays, Looking for Richard has withstood the test of time. It was released in 1996, and is still just as enjoyable and relatable today as it was 20 years ago.