New York Television Festival 2018

By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

The New York Television Festival is thriving in its 10th year. It’s a festival more about informing the participating creators and matching them with networks than red carpet galas and fan screenings.

NYTVF has a very pragmatic way of approaching a festival. All of the panels were very informative with useful, practical information. The network executives and television writers paint a realistic picture of what it was like to deal with a network as a new show creator as well as what it would be like to be in a writers’ room.  There were also panels discussing what writers can expect from general meetings and pitch meetings. They gave practical advice on pitching and how to manage relationships in the business.

NYTVF is a difficult festival to get into with a finished pilot or a script. Everyone who spoke on a panel or as a keynote speaker spoke about NYTVF as an exclusive club. Everyone with work in the festival should be proud to be there and take advantage of the opportunity. If you want to make television and you feel your work is strong, I would highly recommend it.

For more on NYTVF and the festivals we’ve covered this year, check out our No Rest for the Weekend podcast.

 

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Podcast Episode 208: Lea Pfandler

In this episode actor/writer/producer Lea Pflander talks about making the leap from acting to directing as well as her current and upcoming projects.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Google Play. Please remember to like, rate, subscribe, and share. You can also send us your questions, and suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Podcast Episode 204: Matthew Hendershot

4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode I sit down with my friend Emmy Nominated Producer/Director Matthew Hendershot about his career and DIY filmmaking.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Google Play. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

 

Podcast Episode 203: Jason Stefaniak

4749584By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode I sit down with Jason Stefaniak the Feature Narrative Programmer for the Brooklyn Film Festival about BFF and best strategies for film festivals.

No Rest for the Weekend is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Google Play. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Podcast Episode 201: Jenny Paul

4749584By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode I talk with actor/producer Jenny Paul about the need for actors to produce their own work and building a career in film and television.

The No Rest for the Weekend podcast is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Google Play. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

Podcast Episode 110: Yelena Shmulenson

4749584By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode I sit down with actor Yelena Shmulenson. She talks about her career and the hustle and grind of being an actor.

No Rest for the Weekend is hosted by Victoria Oliver and is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and Google Play. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

 

 

Podcast Episode 104- James Oxford

4749584 By Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

In this episode I sit down with indie film producer, James Oxford about his career and the importance of making short films.

No Rest for the Weekend is hosted by Victoria Oliver and is now live on our website, YouTube, iTunes, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, and SoundCloud. We would love to hear your feedback. Send us your questions, suggestions for topics, and let us know if you’d like to nominate a creator to be a guest on our show.

IFP Week September 2017

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4749584 by Jason Godbey, Creative Director, Behind the Rabbit Productions

This September I attended the Independent Feature Project’s Market Week.  IFP was founded in 1979 with the purpose is to connecting filmmakers with resources and help them advance their projects.

Recently IFP started connecting filmmakers and content creators with people in the television and streaming/digital world. I attended a program called Direct Access. It was a day full of meetings with some major players in the industry. There were people from  major television and streaming channels as well as media companies.

My main takeaways were that every network/distribution channel does things differently, and they’re all looking for different things. If you’re pitching a network, the network is looking for your idea. They have directives they need to achieve, and they want to buy your idea and mold it for their audience.

In the digital world, I still get the impression that it’s still a bit of the wild west. One way to get your show made is to make the show release it online, build an audience and then bring that audience to a channel, much like the show High Maintenance did. That was a show Vimeo that was later picked up by HBO after it built a following.

Another way is to pitch the pilot script. Let them read it and see if they think it works for them. They want to see how you write and get a feel for your show. They also want to see it at that script stage, so they can make changes if they feel they’re needed.

The speakers gave us an idea of what the world of TV and streaming series is like and how competitive it is. They also gave us the perspective on what it’s like to be on the other side of the pitch meeting.

IFP Week is also a great opportunity to network with other filmmakers. I met people with whom I can potentially work, and production companies I can work for, as well as potential clients.

Networking is INCREDIBLY important in this business. You can say that about any industry, but film seems to be more of a who-you-know business than any other. If you have a personality, and you can talk to people, you’re much more likely to get a job. Film sets can be pretty intense environment. You’re working closely with the same people and working together to achieve a goal often under very stressful circumstances. As a filmmaker you want good people you can get along with who are dependable. Those relationships have to start somewhere.

I would recommend the IFP experience for filmmakers/content creators, but I would also recommend doing research before you go. Choose the conferences and panels that are right for your goals, research the speakers, formulate intelligent questions, and make sure to go to the mixers and after-parties and network with the people there.  You’ll get the most out of the experience that way.